Move over jollof rice. Fufu is the next big thing.

Move over jollof rice. Fufu is the next big thing.

When Bravo’s Top Chef, contestant Chef Eric Adjepong whipped up a West and Central African favorite - fufu, it was a first for the American reality competition television series. Fufu might not be a household name in the United States, but it's a common dish throughout West and Central African countries like Ghana, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria, Cameroon and the Democratic Republic of Congo with varying ingredients like plantain, cassava, or yams. Known to these communities in the United States and across the African diaspora, its debut on Top Chef elevated the dish to national recognition, paving the way for it to potentially reach the status of the now famous West African jollof rice, which owes its fame to the never-ending banter on which country cooks it the best - the jollof wars, perpetuated through a twitter hashtag of friendly, nationalistic trash talk.

31 Days of Black Women in Food

31 Days of Black Women in Food

Women’s History Month (March) is a time to reflect on the many contributions of women worldwide in various sectors. The culinary industry is currently bursting with talented black women who are giving a boost to much needed diversity in the field. During each day this month, we’re celebrating Black women who are adding their imprint to the food world. From chefs to food bloggers and culinary historians, these 31 Black women are shaking things up through food in  their respective lanes.

2017 Featured Chef: Sean Streete

2017 Featured Chef: Sean Streete

We are excited to announce that our 2017 Featured Chef is Chef Sean Streete, a Jamaican born and Trinidadian raised, native of San Francisco, California. As a part of the selection process, Chef Streete’s tasting menu reflected his Jamaican and Trinidadian upbringing while incorporating innovative dining techniques within each dish. From the nostalgic feels of jerk chicken to escovitch fish, Chef Streete’s menu left us wanting to know more about his passion for food and cooking.  

Chef Jonathan Harris — Don’t call me a “Chicken and Waffles” Chef

Chef Jonathan Harris — Don’t call me a “Chicken and Waffles” Chef

Although attaining a formal degree was beneficial, Harris is among many black chefs who credit their innovative culinary skill set to their passion for flavors and constant pursuit to change the plight of black chefs in the culinary industry. Harris, who is of Costa Rican and African-American heritage, describes his affinity for soul food as a personal struggle.